Social Media Stories

Rules-Of-Social-Media-Infographic

I’m talking to the good people at East Ayrshire Council this week about the power of Social Media & how it can be used, organisationally, for good things.

I’m already talking to them about our local Planning Team who used Twitter and Facebook to generate a much much bigger attendance at public planning meetings. They ask folk to follow a hashtag on the evening of the meeting, encourage live tweeting and live-stream videos of the discussion, in the hope that they capture, understand and maybe even deal with objections to plans before things move too far along the line.

I’m talking about Sainsbury’s re-naming Tiger Bread as Giraffe Bread in 2012, based on feedback from 3 1/2 year old Lily

I’m talking about HR Em’s use of “Kitchen Facebook” & the now slightly infamous #CatFriday to encourage people over the social media wall.

I’m talking about David D’Souza’ s curation of  HR thinkers and contributors through the  Book of Blogs. ( Second Edition available here )

I’ll talk about Ryan Cheyne from Pets at Home; he recently talked at the CIPD Manchester Social Media Conference and he shared an HRD’s perspective on living work-life with a Social Media Thread ( including becoming known for being a consumer of processed meat products such as Spam, and what that did to help him become more known amongst staff in their Retail outlets). Super cute video inspired by #myPetMoments available here:

But what more?

I’m looking for the very best Social Media tales from organisations & people – little things that have happened, without massive budget or over engineering, that have proved to be game-changers.

It doesn’t matter how big or how small your example is. The purpose is to encourage and cheer on East Ayrshire Council staff to continue their good work and efforts with Social Media.

What story would you tell about the Power of Social Media?

 

NB – following the publishing of this post, there was a great response on Twitter with ideas and suggestions – you can find the full curation of this here:

13 thoughts on “Social Media Stories

  1. Before I left RBS Insurance and it became Direct Line Group a social site was created called the BEST Quest. This site was completely open based around social forums. It’s purpose? To get the people who worked for RBS Insurance to help shape what their future organisation was going to feel like and what the values that would underpin their work would be. This social network gave everyone who registered a voice and the ability to to be heard/read – not moderated. It provided the ability to meet people and connect virtually within the business who they would never have known without. The CEO was involved, listening and participating as were other senior managers. Sure there were some negative comments and some moans and groans but these were self governed, the people who were offering something and getting involved soon started to develop a profile for themselves and were asked to participate in the BEST meetings to discuss themes that were coming up in each of the value streams. Champions? Whatever…they played a pivotal role in taking what the masses were saying and playing it back to people who could and would so something about it. I left the company being the second most active on the site and leading a couple of projects around social technologies and their use in the organisation. I would not have been involved let alone leading those projects without the network providing me with a channel to showcase my ideas, enthusiasm and knowledge. It helped develop my thinking around the power of social media within organisations to the extent of shaping the values and how people can work together can change forever.

    • Wow!
      I love the use of tech & virtual spaces to help get participation and get folk thinking about the future shape of their organisation – powerful stuff.
      Thanks for sharing this, I know how you live and breathe social communities. I’m often pointing folk to the DPG community as an example of good participation & a strong social learning platform.
      Awesome.

  2. An old story from Bromford… The 2011 riots kicked us off in eranest (pardon the pun!)…we had been relative cautiousn lurkers until then! In all seriousness we suddenly had a really strong need and hugely valuable tool to help us manage colleague and customer contact and anxiety in a really fast changing situation. Superintendent Mark Payne from Wolverhamoton police (@SuptPayneWMP) was our absolute hero tweeting live from the scene. We all fell a bit in love with him and also twitter at the same time… The sory of how Yammer was introduced here is also a good one … it landed here as a happy accident (well happy for me with a comms hat on but the ICT Director at the time didnt agree ) … but thats a whole other story! In the last week we have lived stream innovation sessions on You Tube to share learning … I joined in from home …. These are just some examples, we use it soc med in lots of ways including an on line social learning community … some trial and error some things have worked somethings havent but we definately love it.

    • I think I’ve read this about three times now – such strong example. I like that some of this was happy accident and some was necessity – that seems to be a theme at times.
      Thanks for sharing Helena – I’m equally a bit loved up with the work at Bromford

    • Fabulous fabulous stuff.
      And from New Zealand to meeting in Manchester – I admire the way you have taken this, run with it and generated something strong.

  3. If it wasn’t for Social Media I would not have hired 3 of my most impressive consultants over past 3 years – David D’Souza, Simon Heath and David Goddin. No agency fees, authentic connection and we all knew that we wanted to work together and that we would be a powerful combination. I use Social Media to source ideas, check out providers, remain informed (we are international and Twitter often raises news, such as demonstrations in the Middle East or Asia, before it hits the mainstream press so we can respond faster) and to find out more about individuals. On a personal level I learn a lot by reading blogs and comments, such as yours – thank you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s