Day One – Why Dialogue ?

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Back in September, I posted a blog on Visibility. It was the first time I’d really spoken out to the wide world about the work I  wanted to do – work with Dialogue groups and support consultants and leaders to “talk well” together. At the time, I was aiming to run sessions in December….turns out it takes a little longer than that to gather courage and content – 2 months longer to be precise – and now Exploring Dialogue has dates and a London home in February and March.

And this week, to support the programme and generate interest, I’m running a short blog series to map my thinking and understanding of Dialogue. I’ll look at dialogue through a few lenses – business, brains, body and beauty – in the hope it generates some discussion and new thinking about how we talk and work together in organisations.

Why dialogue?

I was drawn to dialogue work partly because so many coaching clients or teams I worked with described patterns of stuck conversations, difficulties in changing a relationship or skewed dynamics in a team. My coaching training meant I believed the answer was in learning to ask more and better questions, to inquire well in the world – and this helps, of course….. but often the issue was clients could not get themselves heard well.. and asking questions didn’t scratch that particular itch. They couldn’t advocate or speak out their own perspective confidently or clearly – either that or they advocated too forcefully – which led to frustration, misunderstanding and some very tense interactions.

And this resonated deeply with a story I have about myself – one that says I lost my voice for a time. Somewhere in the midst of working in organisations and consulting and lifestuff generally, I found myself rendered quiet. I had become uncertain as to how to offer what I thought and knew effectively. I found myself either saying little or, if I did find the courage and opportunity to speak, I’d say everything really really quickly … and would then experience the conversational equivalent of tumbleweed… silence…awkward…

This would, in turn, of course render me unable to speak well.

Through working with and practicing techniques, models and thinking around dialogue – advocating well, inquiring well, listening well, understanding my responses and assumptions in conversation, reflecting carefully – I began to reconfigure how I spoke and interacted with the world around me and I began working with clients to do the same. And I want to share what I have learned – what I’m still learning

An Invitation

So this is an invitation – fuchsiablue is running two 2-day workshops designed to encourage attendees to think well and talk well together. It plaits together thinking from Nancy Klein and David Kantor and embodied work from Amanda Ridings and has pinches of Gestalt thinking and understanding Group Process…. and it is more than the theory, it’s experiential – designed to allow you to explore and practice talking well. We’re determined the Exploring Dialogue days will be enjoyable, challenging and offer some deep, long-term lessons in talking well… and cake will figure somewhere, doubtless.

You’ll find more details about Exploring Dialogue here The flyer looks like a flyer – a conversation will be more satisfying, I’d offer…so I’d prefer to talk to you, if you are interested in attending.

If you are curious to know more please get in touch.

Please also pass this on to someone who might be or comment and let me know your thoughts – and no matter what, I hope you enjoy the blogs over the next few days.

11 thoughts on “Day One – Why Dialogue ?

  1. Great blog Julie 🙂 Totally agree that the right words in the right way can be pivotal and crucial to the outcome – very often making it more meaningful. Keep bloggin’ girl and good luck with the events. Do you intend releasing white papers post-event?

    • Hi Neil… It’s a great idea… Not something I’ve ever done, but might be a good “another first” for the year. Hope you enjoy the next few & thank you for comments

  2. Pingback: Marketing and Thinking Deep | Troping

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